ham and cheese.

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The goober on the left has her last day of Kindergarten today. The goober on the right has his last day of second grade. Kids in Upper Cryogenica have to make up lots of snow days, which in some years can mean they won’t graduate until late July.

These kids? They’re freaks of nature. They love school, and both are bummed that the school year is ending. I expect that’s going to change by middle school at the latest.

(There’s this girl on their bus who always has the same hopelessly resigned expression on her face, like she’s being shipped off to the gulag every morning. I think I know now why the bus driver really seems to enjoy having my chipper and chatty kids board her bus.)

Next up: five weeks of SUMMER CAMP. Because they have to learn how to swim, the great outdoors never hurt anyone except when they drown or get eaten by bears, and being bug-bitten while baking in the summer sun builds character.

4 responses

  1. There’s this girl on their bus who always has the same hopelessly resigned expression on her face, like she’s being shipped off to the gulag every morning.

    Maybe she’s bullied at school. Maybe she really is being shipped off to the gulag every morning.

  2. There’s this girl on their bus who always has the same hopelessly resigned expression on her face, like she’s being shipped off to the gulag every morning.

    I was thinking she may be stuck on that bus for a long time. I used to ride 45 minutes each way, and there were kids who were much farther out than I was. They never looked happy.

  3. Ditto on the long bus ride. Our bus ride was almost two hours. In the winter it was dark before we left for and after getting home from school. Daylight savings be damned. People back then must have been of hardier stock.

    Getting home from school was both faster and seemed faster if I got off the bus at a certain corner and walked home (while the bus turned and went the other way for another portion of the route before finally coming by our house.. long after I’d walked in the door.)

    That was back when in America the bus driver could and would open the door while driving for fresh, dust-filled air and let kids out wherever they wanted along the way. That you could get yourself home was something kids were allowed and assumed able to do. Those days seem so long ago. Is thirty years so long ago to have our culture changed so much?

    Enjoy running the kids through Dad Camp. I’ve done that every summer for years. Last year we built a fence and a chicken coop. This year for our Dad Camp our boys (11, 13 & 13) are building a deck.

    Maybe a fun land nav course for your crew? Any geocaching things in your parts?

  4. Miss 11 (year 6) is only now starting to get a bit fed up with school. Up until now both girls love school so much they get upset when they’re too sick to go.

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